Ancestors from the beginning of time

The Balinese go to great efforts to treat their ancestors with utmost respect, as they believe that their spirits, in a very real sense, come back to their homes and the home temples that are a part of each piece of property for a Balinese family.

See #1: Family Temple. The house temple called Sanggah or Merajan, is the place to worship the ancestors and the Hyang Guru.

For more visit here.

Children are very involved in many of the ceremonies and celebrations, as they sing and dance and run to insure that good triumphs over evil.

The penjor is a curved bamboo pole that is decorated with offerings and displayed in the streets of each Balinese village. It’s a significant investment for the village to build and display penjor poles and they are so lovely. The entire island feels lifted up by these skyward, incredible displays.

With a belief in reincarnation and an active role for their remote ancestors, the Balinese are deeply tied to their land and their ancient culture.


Mugging for the camera

Each time I arrive on the building site I get a hello and a wave from at least one of the many workers. Usually from quite a few. And when I raise my camera phone I tend to get a thumbs-up reaction, as a friendly imitation of my daily thumbs-up to the workers.

Today one of the workers signaled that he wanted me to photograph him. He had a few friends watching him and so he made an effort to overcome his shyness when appearing in front of a foreigner. I really appreciated his efforts and the photos tell the story:


A Drop of Kindness, a Well of Gratitude

“Remember there’s no such thing as a small act of kindness. Every act creates a ripple with no logical end.” — Scott Adams

I’m becoming more convinced each day that the real benefit of travel, or expat living, or even tourism (although it’s a challenge to slow down enough as a tourist) — is the small everyday kindnesses shared among people who essentially are strangers.

In the following example, we have recently become friends (but only days ago — strangers) with our housekeeper. Kadeh is a young Balinese woman who cleans the four rooms where we rent. She is diligent and friendly and a genuinely lovely person. She also gets paid below the standard wage, from a Balinese owner, and her husband has to work in a town that’s too far away from their home. Fortunately her two kids are taken care of by her extended family and village and so Kadeh can see her children at the end of each day. She also, like many workers in Bali, works six days a week.

Photo: the author, his wife Shelly, and Kadeh, our new friend

One day Kadeh was talking with Shelly and somehow during the conversation Kadeh mentioned that she hasn’t gone shopping in ages. She neither has the extra time nor the money. And so I asked Shelly if she would take Kadeh shopping. After she chose one item (a blouse) for about 55,000 rupiah ($3.78 USD) Kadeh said she was done. Shelly said to pick another item. Then Shelly, with some convincing, helped Kadeh pick a third item (a total for the three items of $10 or $11 USD). At that point Kadeh became emotional and said it was too much. We were being too generous.

Those who make compassion an essential part of their lives find the joy of life. Kindness deepens the spirit and produces rewards that cannot be completely explained in words. It is an experience more powerful than words. To become acquainted with kindness one must be prepared to learn new things and feel new feelings. Kindness is more than a philosophy of the mind. It is a philosophy of the spirit. — Robert J. Furey

The next morning Kadeh thanked me and cried. We hugged and I mentioned that I was happy to help out.

Shelly and I have done some other, modest giving to the workers on our building project and the reaction is the same: a tremendous amount of gratitude for what, to most foreigners, is a very small amount of money.

The reality is that when you spend time in a developing country you realize that the majority of the world lives very modestly, and for the most part, happily. To participate in it, to get some joy from it, to change yourself a bit, reach out with a warm smile. See the other as an equal, in the sense that we are on the same planet, orbiting a blazingly hot sun in a terrifyingly cold universe. The stranger handing you your lovely beverage at the boutique cafe most likely cannot buy one for herself.

You don’t have to do much. Just be a small drop and let the ripple flow.


A very special Balinese experience

Our builder, Wayan, is a leader in his local village and twice a year hosts a Balinese ceremony.

(Photo: Wayan to my left, his partners, and the site foreman – in a striped shirt)

Wayan invited Shelly and I to a post-ceremony celebration of music, dance and Balinese cuisine at his home. It was a privilege to be a part of his extended family. Everyone was generously and genuinely willing to open their hearts to us.