Week #36 — Much progress but…

It would be nice to see that the light at the end of the tunnel is getting much brighter. Currently it is possible to see that the end is in sight, but it requires a good deal of one’s imagination.

Moving and applying concrete (4X normal speed)
The enchanting mural artist Maria at work (4X normal speed)

Structural view

Here’s a quick 5 second view of our beloved Ohana Retreat Bali:

I know its not very pretty yet, but it will be soon enough.


One minute of workers working

These 19 seconds shows about a typical minute of work. The clip is running at 4X normal speed.

While everyone in this clip is actively working, I should mention that due to the heat the workers do take several breaks throughout the day, in addition to lunch. Their pace is still quite impressive considering the tropical setting.

If you multiply the effort in this tiny movie by over 100,000 minutes that crews of various sizes have been working on this project, then you’ll get some idea of the total work.


Week #33 — 50 workers

We are ramping up to get the finishes done. We have workers encamped from three villages, an electrical & plumbing crew, and a team making custom windows and doors.

You can imagine that labor must be cheap and you’d be correct. There’s a lack of electrical tools since saving a few minutes on each task may not seem worth it. But if it was up to me I’d upgrade to electric as the benefits seems to outweigh the capital cost. But I try to go with the proverbial flow and not demand that my builder change his ways.

Today you can see our kitchen and island coming together. You will be able to join a cooking class and learn how to make amazing Indonesian food.


The male/female divide

The construction industry is notorious for it’s dominance as a “male” industry. In the USA it would be rare to have a female roofer, plumber or an electrician bid for a job.

But in Bali one interesting area where females work side by side men in the construction industry is as concrete helpers. Here the male/female divide is that women move the concrete and the men apply it to brick walls etc.

The surprise is that pound for pound (or rather kilo for kilo) the women move way more weight as men do the finer motor-skilled application work. I guess I’m falling for my own stereotyping by thinking that only men do heavy lifting. Go figure…